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Americus Diamond

Diamond Certification

Since most consumers are not diamond experts, a certificate is an easy way to distinguish differences in diamonds.

A certificate is a grading report from an independent laboratory prepared by a certified Gemologist. The report commonly includes a plotted diagram of your diamond and information about the shape, color, carat weight, clarity, and cut. It gives the exact measurements, table and depth percentages, as well as grading the symmetry and polish of the diamond. It will also have information about fluorescence. A grading report should not include any statement of monetary value about your diamond. It is simply to assure you of the quality and authenticity.




When you purchase a diamond from Americus Diamond, we can provide you with a laboratory certificate from one of the top two labs: Gemological Institute of America (GIA), or European Gemological Laboratory USA (EGL). Americus Diamond understands the importance of quality and value, which is why we only use the most distinguished labs in the world.



Diamond Cut

The cut of a diamond refers to the angles and proportions of the diamond. As light enters a diamond, a well-cut stone will reflect the light from one facet to another and then disperse and reflect it through the top of the diamond. A diamond of good proportions will have more fire and brilliance. A diamond that is too shallow or too deep will loose light out of the bottom or sides of the stone reducing the brilliance.





The shape and the size of a diamond are easily seen while the differences in proportions may be more difficult to spot, even though it is the most important feature in determining the beauty of the diamond. Some of the elements in determining a diamond’s proportions are the table size, depth percentages, crown angles, girdle thickness, polish, and symmetry. Read below to learn more about some of these characteristics.

The table size is the size of the table relative to the diameter of the diamond. It is expressed as a percentage. To grade the table percentage of a round diamond, divide the longest table diameter by the average girdle diameter and multiply the result by 100.

Americus Diamond Find Diamond Jewelry

To grade the table percentage of a fancy shape (anything other than a round), divide the width of the table by the width of the stone and multiply the result times a hundred.

Table diameters of fancy shapes are measured at the same point as their widths.




The total depth percentage is the depth from the table to the culet. It is expressed as a percentage relative to the girdle diameter. Depth percentage affects how the light will interact in the diamond, and thus impacts its brilliance. To calculate the depth percentage of a round brilliant diamond, divide the depth of the diameter by the average girdle diameter and multiply it by a 100. To figure the depth percentage of a fancy shape, divide the depth by the width, and then multiply by 100.

Brilliance in a diamond is also affected by the pavilion depth percentage, which is the distance from the girdle plane to the culet or point at the bottom of the diamond. It is expressed as a percentage of the girdle diameter. The depth can vary slightly because the table and crown size also affect the brilliance of the diamond. Round diamonds that have pavilion depths shallower than 38 percent often have a reflection of the girdle under the table that looks like a ring. This is known as a fisheye and often the stone will look dull or flat. Fisheyes may also be found deeper in the pavilion when the table percentage is larger than 67 percent. If the pavilion is deeper than 48 percent, the stone will appear dark in the center, which is known as nailheads.

Symmetry reefers to the cutter's skill in creating equality between corresponding parts of a stone, which is important in producing an equal display of fire, scintillation, and brilliance. There are no perfectly symmetrical diamonds but it is important that the diamond is round and the culet is in the center of the diamond. Other examples of symmetry variations include misaligned facets, off-center, table, wavy girdles, and table not parallel to girdle.

Diamond Ideal Cut



The culet of a stone is the facet at the bottom of a diamond. It is put there primarily for protection. A culet will look like a small white spot in the center of the table. If a diamond is cut without a culet it will come to a point at the bottom, however, it has little or no effect on the value of the stone.

For maximum scintillation, brilliance, and dispersion, good polish is essential. Polish of a diamond refers to how well the facets of the stone are polished during the cutting process.


Diamond Color

Most diamonds in the world are yellow or brown, making a colorless diamond very rare. Slight color differences in diamonds of comparable weight and clarity will have hundreds --even thousands -- of dollars difference in price. Color differences are very subtle. For example, it is difficult to see a difference between an E and F colored diamond.

A colorless diamond may be more rare but not necessarily more beautiful. Some people prefer a colorless diamond while others prefer a faint yellow. It is important to see the different colors of diamonds side-by-side when deciding what color diamond you prefer. At Americus Diamond we carry diamonds from icy white to a warmer yellow. Come visit our store and let one of our sales professionals compare diamond color and help you decide what color is right for you.


Americus Diamond Color Scale




DEF Colorless – These look great in a white metal
GHIJ Near colorless – Looks great in white metal
KLM Faint yellow – these look especially good in yellow metal.

The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) created a universal diamond color scale that grades white to yellow diamonds. It begins at D (colorless) and runs to Z (light yellow). Each letter grade represents a range of color, not necessarily one specific color. Diamonds are graded loose and color is graded with the diamond face down. Graders compare the diamond to a master set of stones. They are looking at the depth of the color, not the hue itself. It is necessary to have a specific and consistent light source when grading color.

What causes color in diamonds? A diamond's color depends on the kinds of atoms it contains, their arrangement, and how they are bonded together. A diamond of 100 percent pure carbon atoms in a uniform isometric arrangement would be colorless. However, most diamond crystals pick up some other atoms in the growth process. When carbon atoms are replaced by nitrogen atoms in the diamond crystal, the stone will appear yellow. When boron atoms replace carbon atoms, we see the diamond as blue. Experts are not sure what causes diamonds to be brown, pink, or red. When there is radiation present, structural changes will color a diamond green. Other colors are caused by structural distortion and chemical impurities. The rarest fancy color is purple followed by red and green.



Americus Diamond Jewelry Clarity

The clarity of a diamond refers to the presence of inclusions or blemishes and range on a scale from Flawless to Imperfect. Inclusions are natural identifying characteristics such as minerals or fractures, appearing while diamonds are being formed. They may look like clouds, feathers, or tiny crystals. Blemishes are external and can look like scratches and are part of the rough crystal surface left on the finished stone. The general term for blemishes and inclusions is clarity characteristic. These characteristics seldom affect the strength or durability of the diamond, only the rarity.
Below are some descriptions of a few clarity characteristics.

Graining is an irregularity in the atomic arrangement of a growing crystal. It may look like faint lines sometimes in a group or parallel. It may also look like a hazy area in the stone.

Included crystals are crystals of other minerals and occur in groups or singly. They can be any size but small ones are called pinpoints. Included crystals that reach the surface are called knots.

A natural is a spot on the crystal's original surface that the cutter left exposed. Many diamonds have naturals. These are plotted on a laboratory certificate usually with green and sometimes black marks.

To view inclusions, jewelers use 10x power magnification. Americus Diamond has several microscope areas through which customers can view their diamonds and identify the imperfections. Every diamond will have identifying characteristics that are unique to that particular stone.

Flawless diamonds show no inclusions or blemishes of any kind when graded under 10x magnifications.
Clarity Scale


* Internally Flawless diamonds (F-IF) have no inclusions but do have minor surface blemishes.
* VVS1 and VVS2 are diamonds which contain minute inclusions that are difficult even for a skilled grader to see under 10x magnification.
* VS1 and VS2 are grades where inclusions are clearly visible under 10x magnification but are still characterized as small. For example, you may see a small cloud or several pinpoints.
* SI1 and SI2 are diamond grades that are fairly noticeable or easy to see under a 10x magnification. Typical characteristics include clouds, knots, pits and feathers. Usually these are not visible to the unaided eye.
* I1, I2, and I3 are diamond grades which have inclusions that are obvious under 10x magnification as well as visible to the unaided eye




The clarity of a diamond refers to the presence of inclusions or blemishes and range on a scale from Flawless to Imperfect. Inclusions are natural identifying characteristics such as minerals or fractures, appearing while diamonds are being formed. They may look like clouds, feathers, or tiny crystals. Blemishes are external and can look like scratches and are part of the rough crystal surface left on the finished stone. The general term for blemishes and inclusions is clarity characteristic. These characteristics seldom affect the strength or durability of the diamond, only the rarity.

Below are some descriptions of a few clarity characteristics.

Graining is an irregularity in the atomic arrangement of a growing crystal. It may look like faint lines sometimes in a group or parallel. It may also look like a hazy area in the stone.
Included crystals are crystals of other minerals and occur in groups or singly. They can be any size but small ones are called pinpoints. Included crystals that reach the surface are called knots.
A natural is a spot on the crystal's original surface that the cutter left exposed. Many diamonds have naturals. These are plotted on a laboratory certificate usually with green and sometimes black marks.
To view inclusions, jewelers use 10x power magnification. Americus Diamond has several microscope areas through which customers can view their diamonds and identify the imperfections. Every diamond will have identifying characteristics that are unique to that particular stone.
Flawless diamonds show no inclusions or blemishes of any kind when graded under 10x magnifications.

  • Internally Flawless diamonds (F-IF) have no inclusions but do have minor surface blemishes.
  • VVS1 and VVS2 are diamonds which contain minute inclusions that are difficult even for a skilled grader to see under 10x magnification.
  • VS1 and VS2 are grades where inclusions are clearly visible under 10x magnification but are still characterized as small. For example, you may see a small cloud or several pinpoints.
  • SI1 and SI2 are diamond grades that are fairly noticeable or easy to see under a 10x magnification. Typical characteristics include clouds, knots, pits and feathers. Usually these are not visible to the unaided eye.
  • I1, I2, and I3 are diamond grades which have inclusions that are obvious under 10x magnification as well as visible to the unaided eye